How to Write a Business Plan While Playing

BizTech 2.0 is an entrepreneur education program offering business assistance to students over 13. The program teaches business, information technology and life skills to young people via the Internet. It reinforces math learning, reading and critical thinking skills.

The program was launched by The National Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship, an organization located in New York City that was set up from the need for a program for preventing failure and dropout of disadvantaged students from low-income communities. It does this by helping them develop entrepreneurial skills and eventually enhance their economic productivity and improve the quality of their lives and their academic and business skills.

BizTech 2.0 is flexible, user friendly, utilizing the latest technology. It is built of 25 units divided into three levels: basic, intermediate and advanced. It allows on-line learning of how to develop your own business connecting students and teachers.

Students have the advantage of the interactive graphics that reflect the progress through each level.

The program is teacher-led and teachers are permitted to choose the most appropriate work mode for the class or student from: Full Curriculum Mode or BizPlan Only Mode. Both modes result in teaching kids how to write a business plan in a complex, well drawn manner.

What is really helpful and confers the program maximum productivity is the fact that it is designed in such a pleasurable manner that students learn valuable, complex business and entrepreneurship information and enjoy it, as it is known that kids learn most by playing and that’s exactly what they do when working with BizTech 2.0.

The program partially answers the social problems of potential problem-children from low-income urban backgrounds who are usually prone to quitting school and finding ways that are not always “righteous” to make money. But not only this category of kids can benefit from such a program, as it was proven by a study that NFTE graduates possess 20 times more knowledge on basic business concepts and are 30 times more likely to start up their own business.

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